Optimists Hold High School Boys Volleyball All-Star Games

John Yoshikawa, Optimist Sports Director  |  2019-06-06

Volleyball players Matthew Yovzhiy and Jordan Tobey. Photo courtesy Optimist

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The 22nd Annual Optimist High School Boys’ Volleyball All Star games were held on June 2, 2019 at Capital Christian High School, 9470 Micron Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95827.

The Small Schools North team won after playing four (4) sets; 25 – 21; 14 – 25; 25 – 19; and 25 – 17. The North Team Outstanding Player was Matthew Yovzhiy from Mira Loma High School. The South Team Outstanding Player was Jordan Tobey from Vacaville Christian High School.

The Large Schools North Team won the 2nd match after playing five (5) sets, 25 – 20; 20 – 25; 21 – 25; 25 – 21; and 15 – 11.The North Team Outstanding Player was Griffin Walters from El Camino High School. The South Outstanding Player was Miles Judd from Roseville High School.

The Small Schools North Team team was coached by Kay Tindelll from Mira Loma High School and Bill Evans from Wheatland High School. They were assisted by Marissa Tindell from Mira Loma High School. The Small Schools South Team was coached by Bryson Grant and Greg Grant from Capital Christian High School, and Carla Borges from Vacaville Christian High School. They were assisted by Alicia Borges from Vacaville Christian High School. The Large Schools North Team was coached by Winston Prather from Granite Bay High School, and assisted by Brian Jew from Woodcreek High School and Jamie Mathias from Del Oro High School. The Large Schools South Team was coached Dave Amituanai from Laguna Creek High School, and assisted by Theresa Dark from Oakmont High School, and Jill Smith from Elk Grove High School.

 

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Fun Summer Camps, Classes & Special Activities for Kids

Traci Rockefeller Cusack, T-Rock Communications  |  2019-05-30

Zoo Wild Life Stage Show at the Sacramento Zoo. Courtesy of Sacramento Zoo

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - From learning about artistry, aviation or even deep space, a number of Sacramento area museums and destinations are offering unique classes, camps and activities for kids this summer. Space is limited, camps are already filling up fast and parents are encouraged to connect with the individual museum(s) of interest to explore availability.
A number of the 2019 summer camps, classes and activities offered by Sacramento area museums includes the following:

Aerospace Museum of California - The Aerospace Museum is proud to offer an ACE Academy Summer Camp June 17-21 where participants (ages 13-18) will have the opportunity to meet aviation professionals, learn the basics of flight planning and aviation history, explore the physics of flight, take field trips to various airports and aviation-related sites, pilot an aircraft in a flight simulator, and take an orientation flight in a single engine aircraft. To find out more details about this exciting camp led by two Southwest Airlines pilots and/or register, please visit www.aerospaceca.org/ace/;

Crocker Art Museum - The Crocker's high-quality, full-day art camps are designed to support campers (ages 5-6 and 7-9) as they explore, imagine, experiment and create. Camps, which start on June 17 and continue into early August, focus on process over product and offer participants an opportunity to explore diverse subjects and materials through the Museum’s renowned collection and special exhibitions. Campers develop friendships and critical thinking skills through looking at, talking about, and creating art. For more details and/or register, please visit www.crockerart.org/camps2019;

Fairytale Town - Fairytale Town offers 27 exciting and educational summer camps for children ages 4 – 6 and 7 – 9. Each weeklong camp is designed for a specific age group and features a unique theme, including visual and theatre arts, literature, puppetry, animals, gardening and more! Children can explore new areas of interest or dive deeper into their favorite topic. For more information or to register, visit www.fairytaletown.org;

Maidu Museum & Historic Site – If your kids (ages 8-10) love the outdoors, getting dirty and having fun, consider enrolling them in the Center’s nature camp for fun activities and crafts about the natural world around us. With a half-day summer camp scheduled June 10-14, participants will enjoy hands-on experiences with plants and learn fun facts about the fascinating animals that live in our community. For more information and/or to register, visit this link (click on “Register” then “Specialty Camps): www.roseville.ca.us/cms/One.aspx?portalId=7964922&pageId=8890615

Powerhouse Science Center – Powerhouse summer camps (targeted to 2nd to 6th graders) combine innovative science projects, creative challenges, outdoor games and, of course, lots of fun. Starting on June 10 and continuing into early August, summer camp themes revolve around central concepts such as space, nature and general science with titles such as Whodunit? CSI 2019, Mission Blast-Off: Escape from Mars!, Hacking 101: Where Science & Technology Collide, Prehistoric Life: On Land, In Air and Under the Sea, Robots and Rovers: Space Exploration Through Time, and Lights, Camera, Action: Summer Science Blockbusters. For more details and/or register, please visit www.powerhousesc.org/summer-camps/;

Sacramento Children’s Museum – The Museum offers a variety of summer camps starting in June and continuing into August that take place at three locations including the Laguna Town Hall in Elk Grove, Hagan Park in Rancho Cordova and at the Museum also in Rancho Cordova. Camps appeal to various ages with topics that include the following: Drama-Rama Theater Play Camp, Jurassic Camp, Art Studio Camp, Ocean Explorers Camp, Story Factory Camp, Outer Space Camp, Global Art Camp, Cooking Around the World Camp and Concoction Lab Camp. To find out more details and/or register, please visit www.sackids.org/camps;

Sacramento History Museum – The Museum is proud to offer fun and history-rich summer camps through the month of July. Camps include a theater based camp, History Live!, a Sacramento history centered camp, Gold Fever!, and a camp all about archaeology, Dig It!, that will engage, stimulate, and captivate young minds. Plus, all summer camp participants will visit Old Sacramento museums, state historic parks and local historic sites as part of the memorable experience. To find out more details and/or register, please visit www.sachistorymuseum.org/2019-history-camp/;

Sacramento Zoo – The Zoo offers a series of summer camps and classes from June through August that are very popular and sell out quickly. The camps and classes are targeted by age (K-12 grades) and take place in an exciting atmosphere that allows camp counselors a unique opportunity to reach kids and inspire them to care about wildlife, wild spaces and learn how to help protect them. To find out more details and/or register, visit www.saczoo.org/education/camps/;

Verge Center for the Arts The Center is excited to offer three themed studio camp weeks per age group (kids ages 6-9 and 10-13) that start on June 17 and continue into August. Topics include Immersive Space: Installation Art, Paper Mache Creatures: Puppets & Alebrijes, and Art on the Walls: Murals. The summer camps are designed to introduce and foster a love for the arts through hands-on activities, instruction and exploration. For more details or register, please visit https://www.vergeart.com/classes/kidscamp2019/.;

For more information about upcoming activities offered by Sacramento area museums, “like” them on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/SacMuseums, follow them on Instagram and Twitter @SacMuseums or visit the user-friendly website at www.SacMuseums.org.

About Sacramento Area Museums (SAM)
Comprised of 30 greater Sacramento area museums working in partnership with Visit Sacramento, SAM’s mission is to raise awareness of local museums by giving the community the opportunity to discover the region’s fine art, history, science and wildlife treasures. SAM achieves its mission through implementing cooperative promotions and developing strategic marketing alliances, by encouraging sharing of knowledge and resources among its partner institutions. For more information, visit www.SacMuseums.org.


 

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Big Day of Giving

By Vasey Coman, Sacramento Region Community Foundation (SRCF)  |  2019-05-29

Handful of Big Day of Giving 2019 nonprofits. Photo courtesy of SRCF

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - During this past Big Day of Giving, nonprofits in the Sacramento region raised nearly $8.4 million from over 23,000 donors who gave 44,000 donations, exceeding the $7.4 million raised last year and bringing the total generated since the inception of this annual giving day to nearly $40 million.

“Yesterday, our community came together to celebrate the nonprofits that strengthen our region and build a better Sacramento area for everyone who lives here,” said Linda Beech Cutler, chief executive of the Sacramento Region Community Foundation, which has organized the day-long giving challenge since its beginning in 2013, when research demonstrated local philanthropy lagged national averages.

“When we launched Big Day of Giving, we aimed to grow giving in the capital area by making philanthropy something everyone in our community feels they can do. All these years later, it is incredibly heartening to see a philanthropic spirit thriving,” said Cutler.

“This community-wide movement is successful when the people who live here make a difference by chipping in to give back—during Big Day of Giving and every other day of the year, too,” she said, noting that the majority of the donations made through the Big Day of Giving website were under $50.

In all, nonprofits in the capital area generated $8,357,897* on May 2, and each of the 601 participating nonprofits received donations.

The organizations that topped the leaderboard represent a breadth of nonprofit sectors—the arts, human services, youth development, the environment, and animal services:

The amount each participating nonprofit raised is available to view on the website.

Along with helping nonprofits raise much-needed funds, the Foundation offers a robust training program to help build the capacity of participating nonprofits in areas such as donor engagement, board development, collaboration, marketing outreach, and storytelling prior to Big Day of Giving.

“Big Day of Giving has been essential to our work,” said Nicholas Haystings, Executive Director of Square Root Academy, which raised $8,335 on May 2 to fund the free STEM education it offers in underserved Sacramento neighborhoods. “We are a relatively new organization, so the Big Day of Giving networking and skill-building trainings have been essential to helping our small staff engage new supporters and grow interest in our programs—which means we can focus more on growing our impact.”

Gifts made during Big Day of Giving 2019 will fund diverse services throughout the region. Along with Square Root Academy’s classes, Big Day of Giving donations will make possible Runnin’ For Rhett’s purchase of 682 pairs of running shoes to educate area youth about the value of living a healthy lifestyle. Donations will also fund 14 weeks of Food Literacy Center’s classes at a local school, and ensure thousands of high school baseball players can access Keep Playing Baseball’s resources to succeed as collegiate student-athletes.

Nonprofit organizations held more than 100 events throughout the region to promote their missions and generate donations on Big Day of Giving, many of which were the result of collaborations between multiple participating organizations and local businesses. Creating alliances like these among nonprofits is a key goal of the Foundation’s initiative to strengthen the nonprofit sector, Expanding Philanthropy and the Social Economy.

In addition to Big Day of Giving donations raised off of the website and during events—which organizations had to add to their totals—many participating nonprofits raised pools of match funds to motivate day-of gifts; this year, organizations raised almost $1.5 million in matching funds.

Donors who gave through Donor Advised Funds at the Foundation and its partner, Yolo Community Foundation, made a significant impact during this year's giving day, too. In all, gifts from Foundation fundholders totaled $758,290 of the final tally.

Big Day of Giving was made possible with lead sponsorship by Western Health Advantage, in addition to the generosity of its other community partners.

To learn more about Big Day of Giving, please visitwww.bigdayofgiving.org, and follow it on Facebook andTwitter.

Nonprofits and their supporters in the Sacramento region should mark their calendars for next year’s Big Day of Giving on Thursday, May 7, 2020.

Big Day of Giving is powered by the region's online nonprofit portal, GivingEdge, and both are brought to the capital area by the Sacramento Region Community Foundation as part of its initiative to grow local philanthropy. Learn more on the Foundation's website, and sign up for its e-newsletter to stay abreast of the latest in local philanthropy.

Big Day of Giving 2019 is sponsored by Western Health Advantage, and was made possible with the support of many community partners. Find a complete list on the Big Day of Giving website.

Sacramento Region Community Foundation has been the trusted steward of charitable assets, a community catalyst for meaningful change and the advocate for shaping vital impact through philanthropy since 1983. As the center of philanthropy in the Sacramento Region, the Foundation's mission is to transform our community through focused leadership and advocacy that inspire partnerships and expand giving. Learn more at www.sacregcf.org.

 

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Antiques Roadshow Returned to Sacramento

Story and photos by Trina L. Drotar  |  2019-05-29

Al and Virginia show off their treasures – a French doll that is actually German, a Jerry Crandall painting paid for legal services with a tiny pistol that Al said “allegedly a lawyer carried this with him.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Approximately 22,000 people sent emails in hopes that they would be selected to have their treasures appraised when Antiques Roadshow pulled into Sacramento and set up shop Monday, May 13th at Crocker Art Museum. Two thousand pairs of tickets were distributed to fans and casual viewers from the Sacramento area and far beyond. Each person was invited to bring two items for appraisal, along with the story behind each object.

This is the show’s second visit to Sacramento, and according to one lucky viewer and collector of treasures who won tickets both times, this visit was quite different. The first time, the event was held in the Convention Center nearly ten years ago and long lines were normal.

“This time, Antiques Roadshow was a well-oiled machine,” said Mattie, who has watched the show since its inception and followed its precursor, “The Collectors.”

“We didn’t have to search for parking because a parking lot was reserved for attendees and a shuttle bus took us to and from the Crocker.”

The show issued tickets with times spaced thirty minutes apart, which helped keep lines to a minimum, although some lines were definitely busier than others. The clock appraisers were hoping for people, while lines for Asian art, jewelry, and paintings were longer.

A triage appraisal area was set up in the Crocker’s dining area where preliminary appraisals determined which lines people needed to visit. A watch, it turns out, could end up in the collectibles line if it was a Mickey Mouse watch.

The show works regularly with 150 appraisers who volunteer their time, and KVIE’s marketing guru, Sarah, said that Sacramento’s event had about 70 appraisers on hand, including Brian Witherell, COO and Consignment Director of Witherell’s Auction House located in Sacramento.

The event also enlisted the help of 125 volunteers who performed an array of duties from greeting people to guiding them to their appropriate destinations. Some appraisers were in the courtyard and others were on the second floor in the Crocker ballroom and adjacent gallery rooms.

As fans of the show know, there is always a story behind the object and of the expected 4,000 attendees, 150 segments would be taped based on suggestions from the appraisers. Of those segments, the show hopes to pull together three one-hour episodes to air in 2020.

One of those stories was discovered near the feedback booth, something that was not available when the show visited in 2010. Al and Virginia brought in a doll that she believed to be French. It was German and the clothes were not original. She still loves the doll. Al discovered that his pistols are something that he needs to further pursue by contacting Smith and Wesson as suggested by his appraiser.

This couple did not win the lottery pull for tickets, but they were offered a second chance through a program called “Knock Our Socks Off.”

The painting Al carried was given to him by the artist, Jerry Crandall. Al explained that the painting was payment for his legal work for Crandall’s divorce.

“Allegedly a lawyer carried this with him,” he said about the tiny circa 1855 pistol pointed toward the painting.

Look for Al and Virginia when the credits run next year during one of the Sacramento episodes.

Sacramento police officers secured the street in front of the museum and manned a table in order to examine firearms which include pistols and rifles older than 1899 for the California visit.

Several attendees came in costumes ranging from top hats to Victorian Era dress.

Show fans might have recognized Leila Dunbar, the baseball expert, and Nicholas Lowry, the poster and print expert who looked dapper in his brown plaid suit and waxed mustache.

The consensus from attendees was that the event was fun, well organized, and everyone had a smile.

For additional information, visit: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/.

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SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Homelessness and housing instability forces families to make hard choices about the necessities of life and can make a significant impact on a family’s overall well-being. For families receiving reunification and family maintenance services through child welfare, Sacramento County is helping to address these housing needs with the Bringing Families Home housing program.

The goal of this program is to reduce the number of families experiencing homelessness, increase family reunification, and prevent foster care placements.

Bringing Families Home is a California Department of Social Services grant-funded program that began July 2017 and has already supported 87 families in need of housing services. Over the next year, the program will secure housing for a minimum of 100 Sacramento County families who are completing court-ordered services and working towards family reunification.

“Housing is a basic need and when parents are experiencing homelessness and housing instability, this need is often prioritized over the required services needed for reunification,” said Sacramento County Program Planner, Niku Mohanty-Campbell.

“Child Protective Services works to provide housing stability while also allowing parents to better engage in services and address the issues that brought them to the attention of child welfare. Bringing Families Home allows for more safe and timely reunification and can prevent future foster care placements, overall supporting better child welfare outcomes,” he stated.

To address the housing needs of Child Protective Services families, the Sacramento County Department of Child, Family and Adult Services has partnered with the County’s Department of Human Assistance along with the Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency, and other organizations to provide families with an initial assessment, service and support to obtain housing, and short term case management once housing is located.

Families are referred to the Bringing Families Home program by their social worker. The program is voluntary, but participation in Family Reunification or family maintenance services is required for program eligibility. The program prioritizes families that are homeless, however, can serve those that are facing housing instability, which includes when a family is at imminent risk of losing their housing.

“Bringing Families Home works to address the barriers to obtaining and maintaining permanent housing for those who are homeless, at-risk of becoming homeless or are receiving Family Reunification or Family Maintenance services,” said Michelle Callejas, Sacramento County Director of Child, Family and Adult Services.

“Through this grant and partnership, we are able to help families find a house, pay up to a double deposit and provide families a rental subsidy for three months after they move in,” she added.

If your family or a family you know is receiving child welfare services and is interested in participating in the housing program, contact Sacramento County Program Planner, Niku Mohanty-Campbell or email CPSBFHHouseReferral@saccounty.net.

Bringing Families Home is one of several County programs helping families and individuals experiencing homelessness transition to permanent housing stability. Ongoing County programs include the County’s Flexible Supportive Re-Housing Program, the CalWORKS Housing Support Program as well as new programs, such as the Flexible Housing Pool (FHP), an $8 million re-housing program funded through the new State Homeless Emergency Aid Program.

Launching in May, FHP will help resolve homelessness for up to 600 households, including vulnerable seniors, those engaged with criminal justice, unsheltered individuals and families, and those staying in an emergency shelter.

For additional information on County homeless activities, visit Sacramento County’s Responding to Homelessness webpage.

 

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Walmart Opens First Stand-alone Transportation Office in Sacramento

By Kim Ericksen, Elevate Public Affairs  |  2019-05-22

L-R: Derek McCowan, James Hulbert, Richard Prescott, Uni Cerezo (GM of the Sacramento Office), Peggy Biro, Steve Harper and McClellan Park

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Walmart is opening the retailer’s first-ever standalone transportation office in Sacramento in a bid to recruit up to 130 experienced truck drivers for its private fleet.

The office, which opened a temporary location on April 1, will service stores and distribution centers in northern California, southern Oregon, and east to Reno, Nevada. Drivers at this location will qualify for the company’s recently announced driver pay increase. Walmart drivers can earn an average of $87,500 in their first year of employment with an all-in rate of nearly 89 cents per mile.

Walmart has more than 65 transportation offices throughout the country, but Sacramento will be the first that is not co-located with a distribution center. The permanent location will be located in the McClellan Business Park and will have a drop yard. The office will have 85 trucks and 100 trailers.

“We’re excited to open a facility in Sacramento where there is a deep pool of talented, experienced truck drivers,” said Uni Cerezo, regional transportation manager of the Sacramento transportation office. “Walmart continues to explore how we can operate more efficiently and serve our customers’ changing needs, and this office will serve an important customer market for us.”

Walmart plans to accept internal Walmart transfers and recruit externally. To qualify to drive for Walmart, a driver must have 30 months of commercial driving experience in the last three years and a clean safety record for the past three years. For details and to apply, please see www.drive4walmart.com.

Those drivers hired to staff the Sacramento transportation office will differ from others in the industry in that they will start and end their weeks in the same location and have home time each week. Other perks and benefits of driving for Walmart extend well beyond the competitive per/mile rate and activity-based pay. Some of the reasons truck drivers say they enjoy working for Walmart include:

Great benefits. Walmart drivers have access to company benefits on the first day and can earn as much as 21 days of Paid Time Off (PTO) in their first year;

Predictable home time. Walmart operates on a weekly schedule, so drivers know when they will be home and on the road. We use a bidding process two to three times a year to set their schedules, so drivers know where they stand on work-life balance;

Walmart is one of the safest fleets operating with contemporary well-maintained equipment. At Walmart our drivers drive and earn money rather than waiting for a truck to be fixed. Walmart offers quarterly safety bonuses and a safety incentive and recognition programs. The American Transportation Association has awarded Walmart the Safest Fleet in the Over 250 Million Mile Division for the past 5 consecutive years;

Transportation offices all over the country. Walmart operates more than 70 transportation offices throughout the U.S.;

No-touch freight. Walmart truck drivers don’t unload trucks;

Safe parking. Walmart drivers park in well-lit, safe parking in Walmart stores, Sam’s Clubs and distribution centers across the country.


 

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Sacramento Life Center Receives $10,000 for Medical Services for Low-Income Pregnant Women

By Kristin Thébaud, Kristin Thébaud Communications  |  2019-05-17

A patient receives an ultrasound at Sacramento Life Center. The nonprofit recently received grants for its free medical services. Courtesy Sacramento Life Center

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Sacramento Life Center in Arden has received $5,000 each from the Leonard Family Foundation and Kelly Foundation to provide free medical services to low-income pregnant women and teen girls through the group’s primary clinic located in the Arden area and its Mobile Medical Clinics that travel throughout the Sacramento area.


“We are grateful to the Leonard Family Foundation and the Kelly Foundation for this generous funding,” said Marie Leatherby, executive director, Sacramento Life Center. “The Sacramento Life Center has seen a 30 percent increase in women and teen girls seeking our services since our move to Arden. The majority of them are low-income, and half have no medical insurance. These grants will help thousands of mothers and their children receive the medical care they need.”


The Sacramento Life Center’s mission is to offer compassion, support, resources and free medical care to women and couples facing an unplanned or unsupported pregnancy. The Sacramento Life Center’s licensed Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic includes a primary clinic and two Mobile Medical Clinics that provide all services for free, including pregnancy tests, STD tests, ultrasounds, peer counseling for men and women, education and resource referrals.


The nonprofit also offers a school-based teen education program, a 24-hour hotline and a program for women seeking support after having an abortion. For more information about the Sacramento Life Center’s Sac Valley Pregnancy Clinic, visit www.svpclinic.com.


For more information about the Sacramento Life Center or to make a donation, visit www.saclife.org.
Source Kristin Thébaud Communications

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